You can still receive federal work-study

If your school or employer closes and you lose your federal work-study job, you may be eligible to receive multiple payments or a one-time grant for the remaining period you were set to work.

The amount you receive will be based on your award amount rather than hours worked. Contact your college to find out how they are carrying out this policy.

You may get reimbursed if your campus closes housing

If your campus closes in the fall due to COVID-19, you may be able to get some of your money back. In the spring most schools reimbursed students for some of their non-tuition costs, such as housing, meals and facility fees.

Don’t count on a tuition discount if your college switches to online learning. But ask about potential refunds for classes that can’t be held remotely, such as physical fitness or hands-on lab courses.

Getting a reimbursement will be similar to returning a purchase — you’re either going to get a credit to use for a future payment to the school or a direct refund, and it all depends on the school’s policy.

Any amount you receive back into your account or as a future credit will be prorated, meaning you’ll receive a portion of the overall costs you paid according to how much time is left in the semester.

You can keep refunds from unused loans, but it’s still borrowed money you have to repay. Consider returning those funds to your lender, especially if you have an unsubsidized federal loan, PLUS loan or a private loan, which all accrue interest while you’re in school.

Check with your school’s financial aid office if you have questions.

You could stay on campus if you have nowhere to go

If your school closes campus in the fall and the dorm is your primary residence, contact your college housing and financial aid offices to find out your options for remaining on campus.

Colleges made concessions for students with extenuating circumstances, such as those who are low-income, homeless or are international students from countries with travel restrictions.

Your school may keep a certain portion of housing open, but contact your school’s housing office to find out if meal services will continue and about your options for food.

Emergency aid may be available

Colleges may have emergency funds already available, and the CARES Act provided $7 billion in funds to colleges specifically designated for emergency financial aid.

The CARES Act mandated that schools can use Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant funds to provide emergency aid to students experiencing a qualifying emergency due to COVID-19. This could include emergency grants, loans, scholarships or vouchers to cover expenses related to schooling and housing. Much, if not all, of this aid may have already been distributed last spring.

Loan and Pell Grant limits are waived

For those who did’t complete college last spring, the CARES Act calls for colleges to waive lifetime limits on certain aid, including Pell Grants. That means any federal direct loan or Pell Grant money you used for school in the spring semester won’t count toward your lifetime limit for either aid type.

You can apply for more financial aid

You can request more financial aid even if you have already filed the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. This is useful if your family’s finances have changed due to events like job loss or medical expenses.

To update the FAFSA, sign in to fasfa.ed.gov and click on “Make FAFSA Correction.” Enter your FSA ID, make changes and submit. You can make changes up until the FAFSA deadline — June 30 after the school year you need aid. So if you need more aid to help out with expenses this school year, you have until June 30, 2021, to do it.

You can also contact your school’s financial aid office with your request for more aid via email or phone. Include a request for a specific additional sum you’ll need and supporting documents.